Uno, Dos, Tres Agaves on National Margarita Day

While many debate the origins of the most popular American cocktail, the Margarita, we know one thing for certain – Tres Agaves was born with a mission: to make the freshest, most authentic and delicious Margarita the world’s ever tasted, and the reason is simple:  We keep it simple.

100% pure agave Tequila.  All-natural Agave Nectar.  Fresh lime juice. 
 
NO corn syrups. NO food coloring. NO artificial sweeteners. 

 
Just pure Margarita greatness.
 

In honor of National Margarita Day, Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011, Tres Agaves is here to remind you that all it takes is Uno, Dos, Tres.

Uno – 2oz Tres Agaves Tequila
Dos – 1oz Tres Agaves’ All-natural Agave Nectar
Tres – 1oz Fresh squeezed lime juice

The result = Perfecto.

Our suggestion: pop down to your local Hispanic or specialty food store and ask for ‘Mexican’ or ‘Key’ limes (different than your standard ‘Persian’ limes). They’re a little smaller in size and it may take a little extra squeeze-action to get your 1oz – but the juice offers a really special tart/bitter complement to the Tequila and Agave Nectar. There’s a reason they only use Key limes in traditional Mexican Margaritas!

Tequila Talk: What’s with the Worm?

In a recent episode of the hit show ‘An Idiot Abroad’, Ricky Gervais’ new project featuring his friend Karl Pilkington (the idiot) traveling the 7 wonders of the world, Karl is forced to eat the worm resting at the bottom of a bottle of ‘Tequila’.

Let’s take this time, however, to make a few points clear. First off, Tequila has zero tradition of including a worm in the bottle. That practice is reserved for Mezcal, Tequila’s cousin. Distilled from the Maguey plant, rather than the Blue Weber Agave, Mezcal sometimes include small insect. But it is not a worm–it’s (usually) the moth larvae hypopta agavis. The ‘worms’ are also known as hilocuiles, chinicuiles, tecoles or gusanos rojos (because of their red colors), and impart a distinctive hue and flavor to the drink.

You are probably thinking, “ok, but why are they in my Tequila…I mean Mezcal?” Take a closer look at the latin name, hypopta agavis (emphasis on agavis), and we find our answer. These organisms begin their lives when their mother plants her eggs in the heart of the maguey plant. They then eat their way out, feeding on the leaves, or pincas, until they form a cocoon, emerge as butterflies and flutter away.

Getting hungry? The mature caterpillars are considered a delicacy in parts of Mexico, and are used in local cuisines. You might also see them deep fried with some salsa picante, wrapped in a tortilla. A 100 gram serving packs almost 700 calories.

Eric Rubin’s Journal: Cooking Agaves

There are 4 ways to cook agaves:

1. In a wood-fired pit, which is rarely used these days except in Mezcal production

2. In clay or stone ovens

3. In autoclaves

4. In a diffuser mill.

But which is best?

These days a few of the big guys use diffuser mills.  While very efficient, wringing every last bit of sugar from the agave fibers, many think the resulting spirit is too astringent and/or has some off-flavors.  Stone ovens are used by most 100% agave producers but require a lot of energy and if not regularly cleaned can develop buildup, resulting in small changes in flavor over long periods of time.

Autoclaves are much more energy friendly as little to no heat escapes, but many producers use very high temperatures to reduce the overall cooking time, with little thought to the quality/taste of the cooked agave.

Tres Agaves uses autoclaves but took a different approach: by lowering the temperature and lengthening the cooking time we end up with a more consistent, clean agave taste.

We think it’s a very happy medium…

Eric Rubin’s Journal: Tequila Interchange Project

Should foreign ownership of Tequila brands be allowed? Some argue no, but Eric Rubin disagrees with this view. In his most recent blog, Eric shares his thoughts on his trip to Mexico with the Tequila Interchange Project…

Ok, so I recently took part in the 2nd trip of the Tequila Interchange Project.

For those of you not familiar with the Project, I’ll let their mission statement do the talking:

“We’re a network of professionals engaged in promoting the education of the culture of Tequila in their local communities and abroad. We strive to create a highway of knowledge between teachers, workers, and connoisseurs of the culture of tequila, from the agave fields in Mexico to the cocktail bars across the USA. We are a network of connections and partnerships. We are both professor and pupil. We are the bridge of communication towards the future of tradition for tequila culture.”

I was fortunate to be selected and had a blast with my fellow team members. I admit that the radical leftist views of Latin American professors took me a little surprise, proposing no foreign ownership of Tequila brands! – but their knowledge, passion, and connection to the region were all very impressive.

The education and conversational aspect of the trip is what I found the most interesting, but I did feel that some of the goals expressed – while rooted in good intentions – could be problematic if not impossible to implement, and may be unfair to the large producers; not to mention small producers that are just starting to forge their own path…