The Faces in that (Mexican?) Frame

I should probably confess that in the age of dynamic design programs and versions of those programs like Photoshop and Illustrator CS5 – I do a quick scope to make sure no one in the office is looking – then open up MS Paint, which is not all that different than rocking a word processor at your desk.


Forget functionality, look at that color! No bueno!

So what kind of visual wonders do I construct in this truly masterful program (where you’re not able to edit much of anything without starting the whole project again!)?

Well heck, I thought, why not introduce the Tres Agaves team/bloggers in a festive frame with a Brady Bunch patchwork of faces (Jamie’s face is not that big in comparison to the others really; I’m learning to resize). But seriously, look at the detail in that frame! All those suns! So sunny! Not sure it’s Mexican really as I found it on iStockphoto but it could very well be Mexican? I typed in ‘Jalisco, authentic, frame’ in the search field.

You’re probably asking who are all these lovely smiling people in that totally Mexican frame? What do they do at Tres Agaves? What can I expect from their blogs? Head to the kitchen and mix yourself a Margarita (with Tres Agaves Organic Margarita Mix). Take a sip or two and read on…

I wrote these intros below so they are not members of the team team espousing grandiose thoughts about themselves…

Mia Harlock (me), Marketing Manager. I’ll be writing about things I see in the press, food and beverage-related tid-bits, and on occasion, events/festivals and random streams of consciousness blah that result from ADD and too much caffeine.
Steve Halili, Marketing Assistant. Steve is our social media dude so he’s the best resource for all things digital, which basically means all things these days, doesn’t it? Let’s narrow that field and say Steve will be waxing poetic about ‘community’.
Ned Cartmell, Marketing Project Manager. He’ll be blogging about Tequila mostly, maybe with a sports score thrown in now and again.
Chris Galante, Arizona & Colorado Market Manager. Out-and-about, in the field, bars and restaurants. It doesn’t matter what Chris says really: 97% of the time it’s funny.
Jamie Chilberg, NorCal Market Manager Jamie is that friend that’s so cool that she knows everything cool going on in your city, and I’m like “Where do you find about about all this?” but I think it’s just in her blood.
Eric Rubin, Brand Director. He’s our knowledge man: 100% agave Tequila, Jalisco, the culture and traditions of Mexico, spirits and the bar & restaurant industry. He’s also our op ed man, so expect some pretty passionate thoughts on things.

We’ll have 4-6 blogs (combined, not each) a month for all you readers moving forward, so make sure to watch this space…

No go finish off that Margarita!

Uno + Dos + TRES = Perfecto!

Regional Cuisine of Mexico… and not a burrito in sight!


The many ingredients in Mexican ‘Mole’ sauce.

By Eric Rubin, Brand Director of Tres Agaves

I’m asked pretty regularly if I can give people a quick overview on the primary regional cuisines from Mexico, that is, the ones you see most often represented (correctly or not!) in Mexican restaurants in the U.S. Keep in mind, this is just a short blog entry, and Mexico is behind only France and China for the number of documented recipes for its native dishes.

To me you have three primary regional cuisines: Yucatecan and Oaxacan in the South, and Jaliscan/Michoacan in central Mexico. Yes, I know I’m leaving out Mexico City! I put northern/border cuisine as closest to Tex-Mex, which I’ll focus on in another entry. For now, I’ll give you my abridged summary on the differences between the regions just mentioned.

Yucatecan – Yucatecan dishes tend to be very colorful and lean towards a fusion of Spanish, Caribbean and native Mexican cuisine. Typical ingredients include: black beans, corn tortillas, pickled red onions, habañero peppers, salsas with fruit. Signature dishes are Cochinita Pibil, Panuchos, Poc Chuc, and Sopa de Lima. There is no distilled spirit native to the Yucatan.

Oaxacan – I’d say Oaxacan is the most complex of all Mexican regional cuisines. Signature dishes include Tlayudas, moles of all types, and molletes. Mezcal is native to Oaxaca.

Jaliscan/Michoacan – Jaliscan cuisine to me is the most rustic of the regions, rooted in a beautiful simplicity. Ingredients include: pinto beans, flor de mayo beans, corn tortillas, chile de arbol, Serrano chile. Signature dishes are Carnitas, Carne en su Jugo, Tortas Ahogadas, Birria, Pozole. And of course, Tequila is the spirit native to Jalisco!