Just what makes a skinny margarita?

(and how do I make one?)

Skinny Margaritas – they’re not just for Real Housewives you know. More and more people are choosing their cocktails based on the calories in the glass. These drinks aren’t new – and this combination of ingredients isn’t out-of-this-world. Well, it is incredibly delicious, but it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to make a drink that gives more to the “tum” than the “bum”. Keep reading and we’ll tell you how.

Let’s start with alcohol. Alcohol equals calories so if you want a skinny margarita you have to make sure you only use so much. So, if you are going to use less Tequila, use good tequila. Start with organic 100% de Agave Tequila, in particular, a Blanco Tequila (we suggest our own). That way, you get more of the agave flavor, which will complement the other ingredients nicely. Of course, you can substitute the Blanco for a Reposado or Añejo (take this quiz to see which Tequila is right for you), and you’ll be happy anyway you choose.

Next, select your favorite soda water. You can go with sparkling water or club soda here. At Tres Agaves, we prefer to use club soda because the added minerals really complement our Tequila’s natural terroir, rich herb and citrus notes, that comes from our home in the Tequila Valley.

Find a cold beverage soluble agave nectar. You don’t want one that will sit undissolved at the bottom of your drink – so pay careful attention to what agave nectar you buy. We, of course, suggest our own! It’s made only from the same agaves we use in our Tequila and filtered water.

Finally, pick out a fresh-looking organic lime. We prefer the real stuff, limes squeezed by hand at the bar or at home, instead of pre-squeeze lime juice – that way you are sure there is no added sugar. There’s something about cocktails made using natural, simple ingredients that gets us excited to squeeze limes.

Ok, so you have your ingredients, now what? Measure out 1.5 oz of 100% de Agave Tequila, 3 oz of your choice of soda water, 0.5 oz of agave nectar, and 1 oz of fresh-squeezed lime juice, add to a cocktail shaker, shake with ice, and pour into a Collins glass over ice. Garnish with a lime wedge as desired.

There, that’s it. A simple skinny margarita made with easy to get ingredients that will wow your friends and family. Enjoy!

What’s Your Tequila?

Our three tequila expressions: Blanco, Reposado and Anejo

As some people know, there are three different expressions of Tequila: Blanco, Reposado and Añejo. But let’s be frank (and less pretentious): expression just means age or aging.

Blanco Tequila, like a lot of white wine, is aged very little or (as is the case with Tres Agaves) not at all. Reposado is aged between 2 and 12 months and finally, Añejo is aged anywhere from 1 year to 3 years.

But the real question is which one is right for you? We’ve created this little quiz to help you figure it out.

1. The favors I like most in food are:
a. Herbal, earthy, spicy
b. Caramel, soft, cinnamon
c. Vanilla, pepper, citrus

2. The cocktails I go for are like:
a. Martinis or any spicy cocktail
b. Manhattans or Old Fashioneds
c. Palomas or Cosmopolitans

3. I mostly prefer:
a. Having my alcohol in cocktails
b. Sipping my alcohol neat
c. Somewhere in between

If your answers were:

Mostly A’s. Purer than driven snow, your answers suggest you are a Blanco person. Blanco provides the most herbal expression of tequila and so is great for mixing in a wide variety of cocktails including ones that are spicy or blend with other herbal types of liqueurs.

Mostly B’s: It seems like you like a bit of a mix because you lean towards Reposado. Because of its aging, Reposado gives you the best of both worlds – a bit of vanilla from barrels and some of the agave plant’s pepper notes. That makes it great for both fruit-focused cocktails or sipping neat.

Mostly C’s You may be someone who likes bourbon or other whiskeys because it seems you lean towards Añejos. Because they are aged the longest of the three expressions we are discussing here, Añejos pick up more flavors and color from the barrels, which makes them a bit richer and more mellow (just like whiskey). That makes Añejos great for darker cocktails or sipping on ice.

There are no wrong answers and we hope that this quiz encourages to try all sorts of Tequila. Just try and make it Tres Agaves Organic 100% de Agave Tequila ok?

Tequila’s Miracle Plant

The Blue Agave plant is not just any shrub

This is a blue agave plant used to make blanco tequila, reposado Tequila  and anejo Tequila. Great agave makes great tequila makes great Tequila cocktails

Originally native to Mexico, the Blue Agave plant is now grown throughout the world.  But only the Blue Agave plant grown in Jalisco, Mexico (plus a few other municipalities) can be used to make 100% de Agave Tequila. In fact, it is the only ingredient for Blanco, Reposado and Anejo Tequila.  
Despite its appearance, the Blue Agave plant is NOT part of the cactus family.  The agave family have more in common with the lily, and have no relation to the cactus, despite both being prickly succulents.  Close relatives to the Blue Agave plant are onions, garlic, palm trees, pineapples, artichoke, and asparagus.  The semi-circular arrangement of their leaves, or layers, hints at a biological similarity.   


The Blue Agave’s unique characteristics are borne from the water-starved environment of Mexico, equipping the plant with a natural resilience to drought and water shortage, as well as a multitude of other, natural defenses. Perhaps it is this need to survive without a lot of water, Blue Agave plants have incredibly long maturity cycle. Most agaves are harvested after 5-7 years of growth, but some jimadores prefer to harvest the plants at 14 years of age.  The longer they mature, the more agavins (fructose) can grow in the piña (the ‘heart’) of the agave, which means more Tequila!  


If you don’t harvest the Blue Agave in time, a large, long stalk grows straight up, with yellow flowers that blossom at its end.  The flowers require much of the piña’s sugar to grow, so jimadores make sure to harvest the plant before the stalk, let alone the flower, grow.  If the plant is left to blossom, it will die off, as it is monocarpic.  


This is a lot of information – truly interesting information – but we don’t blame you if you want a drink to wash down these Blue Agave plant facts. Might we recommend our Organic 100% de Agave Blanco Tequila (but feel to try our Reposado and Anejo too)? Salud!

Blue Agave: Health Facts

You may have heard about this magical plant the Blue Weber Agave plant. And the fact that it is the only ingredient allowed in 100% de Agave Tequila (like Tres Agaves) is not the only reason.

The Blue Weber Agave plant is the only ingredient used in agave nectar. To make the nectar, the agave plant’s piñas are crushed to extract the juices, which are then heated and filtered to create the simple sugar fructose, and then concentred into a syrup. Despite the fact that there are more steps in making agave syrup than say, harvesting honey from a beehive, it’s still considered a healthy option. Agave nectar has:

  • The same calories as honey (54 cal per tablespoon)
  • A very low glycemic index (19-27 vs. 83 and 89 in honey and high fructose corn syrup, respectively) means you won’t get high blood sugar levels.
  • Agave contains saponins, which have anti-inflammatory and immune system-boosting properties (think quinoa and ginseng)

The agave plant is also the source of the probiotic inulin. Inulin acts as food for certain gut bacteria and has been suggested by numerous studies to relieve constipation and promote weight loss.

The more you know!

History of the Jalisco Mule

How did the classic drink find it’s way into the copper mug?

The Moscow Mule was reportedly invented when the presidents of a ginger beer company a liquor distributor and Smirnoff were sitting in a bar inventing a new drink. The iconic copper mug the drink is served in was the genius of John Martin, president of the liquor distributor, who used it as a means for the drink to stand out in bars and be asked for.

As to who the genius was who decided to replace vodka with Tequila we don’t know, but we commend them for it. Here’s our favorite recipe for a delicious Jalisco Mule!

History of the Tequila Sunrise

The Tequila Sunrise cocktail is as colorful itself as its history. The simple recipe, Tequila, orange juice, and grenadine, make a cocktail so delicious and so bright it was adopted by rock stars and found its way to the title of a famous class rock song!

In the 1930s, Gene Sulit of the Arizona Biltmore Hotel combined Tequila, soda water, lime juice, and liqueur to create the first ‘Tequila Sunrise’. Over the years, the drink found its way farther west, landing in the Bay Area. In Sausalito, a city north of San Francisco, the bartenders at The Trident, Bobby Lozoff and Billy Rice, remade the Tequila Sunrise, this time with just Tequila, orange juice, and grenadine. It just so happened The Trident was the site of a private party organized by famous San Franciscan Bill Graham, where one of rock’s greatest bands, The Rolling Stones, was kicking off their 1972 tour of America. Mick Jagger, the lead singer of The Rolling Stones, had one, ordered some for his fellow bandmates, who ordered more for their entourage. Soon the Tequila Sunrise became the Stones go-to drink while on tour, spreading the cocktail nationwide as they ordered the Tequila cocktail in every town they came across.

But the Tequila Sunrise’s love affair with classic rock didn’t end with The Rolling Stones! A year later, in 1973, the Eagles, another great rock band out of California, named one of their songs ‘Tequila Sunrise’ on their Desperado album – cementing the Tequila cocktail’s legacy in not just the annals of rock history, but the spirits and cocktail history of America.

So, are you thirsty yet? Well, grab a bottle of our Organic 100% de Agave Blanco Tequila, some fresh orange juice and grenadine, put on your classic rock (we recommend The Rolling Stones) and mix yourself a ‘Tequila Sunrise’. All there’s left to do after that is enjoy the beautiful day.

Tequila Sunrise Recipe: Click Here!

Dispelling Tequila Myths

Tequila has long had a lot of myths and misinformation surrounding it, which has resulted in it having a certain reputation. But now it’s time to clear up those myths so that you can enjoy tequila in all its glory.  

The Worm

Contrary to popular belief, a bottle of Tequila should never have a worm in it. Some low-quality mezcals contain worms, but it’s best practice to never drink any bottle with a worm in it. By the way, in reality, the worm isn’t really a worm at all, it’s the larvae from a butterfly caterpillar. The more you know.

Tequila is Guaranteed to Give You a Hangover  

No, only bad Tequila is more likely to do that (and only if you drink too much of it, which you should never do). There are two main ways to make tequila: one where 100% of the alcohol comes from the agave plant (100% de Agave Tequila), and another where only 51% of the alcohol needs to come from agave (Misto). It is the Misto that can make your head hurt, mostly because the non-agave alcohol content is frequently of poor quality to keep the price low.  The moral of the story: always buy 100% de Agave Tequila (and if you could make it Tres Agaves, that would be nice) 

You should only use Blanco for cocktails:  

While a Blanco is most popularly used in cocktails, really any Tequila varietal can make a great cocktail.  Try mixing our Reposado in your margarita for a little darker, smokier taste. You can also sub in. tequila for other alcohols in cocktails: try making a Manhattan with Añejo instead of whiskey. 

Tequila is produced from any agave, anywhere in Mexico 

It’s actually a lot more specific than that. Tequila can only be made from the Blue Weber agave, which (by the way) is not a cactus but a member of the lily family, and closely related to yucca, beargrass, and sotol.  What’s more, there are only five states legally permitted to produce Tequila.  While the majority of Tequila comes from the state of Jalisco, Guanajuato, Michoacán, Nayarit, and Tamaulipas have municipal districts sanctioned to produce Tequila.  

All Tequila Tastes the Same 

Definitely not! Just like wine, Tequilas have terroire, an element of taste that comes from the environment where the agave was grown. Tres Agaves is made from agave grown in the Tequila Valley. The plants are older, the soil is more volcanic, and the weather is hotter and wetter. This results in spicier tequilas with a strong citrus element. In contrast, Los Altos (The Highlands) area, has soil that is rich in iron and weather that is both cooler and dryer. This results in slightly sweeter tequilas with hints of vanilla and fruit.   

There you have it – a few of Tequila’s most popular misbeliefs dispelled. Check out our products, we sell organic 100% de Agave Tequila and organic cocktail mixers. We have dozens of delicious cocktails recipes to step your bartending game up, as well! Salud.

Tequila History: Part Two

Blue Weber Agave before being harvested and turned into 100% de Agave Tequila

And here continues the history of Tequila. In June, we explained the roots of Tequila in the Aztec civilization and how the Spaniards distilled agave spirits to create a brandy-substitute. Now let’s see how Tequila came to be known as ‘Tequila” and the Mexican government’s promotion of the spirit.

The 1700s to 1800s AD: 
In 1758, the King of Spain granted Senior José Antonio Cuervo the rights to cultivate land in Mexico, laying the foundation of the Jose Cuervo brand, the largest producer and exporter of Tequila today.  In 1858, Don Cenobio Sauza fell in love with agave farming, founding Sauza Tequila and beginning the great rivalry between Sauza and Cuervo. During the mid-1800s, the Blue Weber agave was identified as the ideal plant for Tequila and insisting the spirit can only be made from this strain of agave.  Previously, various types of agave species were used; today, many of those agave species are distilled into mezcal. In 1873, Tequila was first exported to and made its debut in the United States, thanks to the work of the original Tequila families.  After Mexico gained independence in 1823, Tequila became a symbol of national pride, as European spirits were cast aside. The popularity of the spirit grew outside of Mexico as Prohibition in the US pushed American imbibers to smuggle the agave spirit into the US, and again during World War II when the decreased supply of European spirits.  As a result of this growing demand, the Mexican government created new regulations and two government bodies to oversee production and exportation.

The 1900s AD:
Mexico, aware of Tequila’s international renown, declared the term “Tequila” as its intellectual property through various treaties and international agreements, giving the country the unique right as the only country with legal rights to produce “Tequila”.  With Mexico now the sole exporter of Tequila, the industry boomed. To protect the fast-growing industry becoming symbolic of the country, the Mexican government instituted regulations ensuring a high level of quality in Tequila production. One of the most important rules is the guidance that, to be called Tequila, the spirit must contain at least 51% Blue Weber Agave. Agave-distilled spirits with only 51% Blue Weber Agave are called mixto – the remaining 49% of the spirit is made from low-quality sugars.

A true, high-quality Tequila should be made with 100% Blue Weber Agave. Tres Agaves is proud to use single-source, 100% de Agave Tequila. Now you’ve read the history of Tequila, how it grew from its prehispanic, ritualistic roots, to become the symbol of Mexican national pride it is today. It’s time to sip some yourself! Find our 100% de Agave Tequila near you.