Mexican Independence Day

Mexican cuisine – Chiles en nogada

September 16th is Mexican Independence Day (no, it’s not Cinco de Mayo), and believe it or not Mexican and American Independence have quite a few things in common.

Both were seeking to overthrow a colonial government that had conquered the native peoples of that land – the British for the Americans, and the Spanish for the Mexicans.

In addition, both revolutions have a rallying cry “moment” that fanned the flames of freedom. The Mexican equivalent of the Boston Tea Party is “El Grito” – the day Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla called on Mexicans in the town of Dolores to rise up against the Spanish.

Hidalgo was already involved in the revolutionary movement and it was, in fact, José Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara (the George Washington of Mexico) who asked Hidalgo to inspire people to revolution. On the 16th of September at 2:30 AM (having freed about 80 pro-independence inmates from jail), Hidalgo rang the church bells and gathered the populous and said (in essence): “Long live Our Lady of Guadalupe [symbol of the Indians’ faith], death to bad government, death to the gachupines [the Spaniards]!”.

Each year the President of the Mexican Republic shouts a version of “El Grito” from the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City: “Viva México! Viva la Independencia! Vivan los héroes!” Everybody else celebrates with fireworks, bands and the odd glass of Tequila. We suggest you join them, raise a glass of Tres Agaves Tequila, and cheer, ‘Salud’!

History of the Jalisco Mule

How did the classic drink find it’s way into the copper mug?

The Moscow Mule was reportedly invented when the presidents of a ginger beer company a liquor distributor and Smirnoff were sitting in a bar inventing a new drink. The iconic copper mug the drink is served in was the genius of John Martin, president of the liquor distributor, who used it as a means for the drink to stand out in bars and be asked for.

As to who the genius was who decided to replace vodka with Tequila we don’t know, but we commend them for it. Here’s our favorite recipe for a delicious Jalisco Mule!

Dispelling Tequila Myths

Tequila has long had a lot of myths and misinformation surrounding it, which has resulted in it having a certain reputation. But now it’s time to clear up those myths so that you can enjoy tequila in all its glory.  

The Worm

Contrary to popular belief, a bottle of Tequila should never have a worm in it. Some low-quality mezcals contain worms, but it’s best practice to never drink any bottle with a worm in it. By the way, in reality, the worm isn’t really a worm at all, it’s the larvae from a butterfly caterpillar. The more you know.

Tequila is Guaranteed to Give You a Hangover  

No, only bad Tequila is more likely to do that (and only if you drink too much of it, which you should never do). There are two main ways to make tequila: one where 100% of the alcohol comes from the agave plant (100% de Agave Tequila), and another where only 51% of the alcohol needs to come from agave (Misto). It is the Misto that can make your head hurt, mostly because the non-agave alcohol content is frequently of poor quality to keep the price low.  The moral of the story: always buy 100% de Agave Tequila (and if you could make it Tres Agaves, that would be nice) 

You should only use Blanco for cocktails:  

While a Blanco is most popularly used in cocktails, really any Tequila varietal can make a great cocktail.  Try mixing our Reposado in your margarita for a little darker, smokier taste. You can also sub in. tequila for other alcohols in cocktails: try making a Manhattan with Añejo instead of whiskey. 

Tequila is produced from any agave, anywhere in Mexico 

It’s actually a lot more specific than that. Tequila can only be made from the Blue Weber agave, which (by the way) is not a cactus but a member of the lily family, and closely related to yucca, beargrass, and sotol.  What’s more, there are only five states legally permitted to produce Tequila.  While the majority of Tequila comes from the state of Jalisco, Guanajuato, Michoacán, Nayarit, and Tamaulipas have municipal districts sanctioned to produce Tequila.  

All Tequila Tastes the Same 

Definitely not! Just like wine, Tequilas have terroire, an element of taste that comes from the environment where the agave was grown. Tres Agaves is made from agave grown in the Tequila Valley. The plants are older, the soil is more volcanic, and the weather is hotter and wetter. This results in spicier tequilas with a strong citrus element. In contrast, Los Altos (The Highlands) area, has soil that is rich in iron and weather that is both cooler and dryer. This results in slightly sweeter tequilas with hints of vanilla and fruit.   

There you have it – a few of Tequila’s most popular misbeliefs dispelled. Check out our products, we sell organic 100% de Agave Tequila and organic cocktail mixers. We have dozens of delicious cocktails recipes to step your bartending game up, as well! Salud.