History of the Sangrita


While one typically thinks of salt and lime when imagining what should accompany Tequila, there is another authentic Mexican companion to the 100% de agave spirit.  Sangrita (“little blood” in Spanish) is a citrus-heavy mixture of orange, lime, and pomegranate juice, powdered chiles, and other spices, and was born in Jalisco, Mexico, the same state Tequila calls home. 

Sangrita is believed to the result of a mixture of leftover juices from pico de gallo, a fruit salad popular in Guadalajara.  When the salad was consumed, the leftover juices were poured into small clay cups and imbibed alongside the post-meal Tequila, a well-noted digestif. As Sangrita has made its way north in the United States, the recipe has adopted a more savory flavor profile. Americans have added tomato juice to meet the level of citrus juices. 

Sangrita isn’t meant to muffle the strong citrus and herby flavors of Tequila. It is meant to sip alongside the spirit, so its savory and citrusy flavors can amplify Tequila’s terroir.  When drinking our award-winning, organic 100% de agave Tequila, we can’t recommend Sangrita enough.  If you’re looking to cover up sting of low-quality Tequila, stick to salt and lime. 

Mexican recipe:
Ingredients

  • 8 ounces fresh grapefruit juice
  • 2 ounces fresh orange juice
  • 4 ounces fresh lime juice
  • 5–10 dashes hot sauce (more or less to taste)
  • Ground black pepper
  • Salt

Directions
Combine all ingredients and stir. Add salt and pepper to taste.

American recipe:
Ingredients

  • ¼ medium white onion
  • ½ dried ancho chili
  • 1 jalapeño, halved
  • 4 ounces tomato juice (Sacramento)
  • 4 ounces fresh orange juice
  • 3 ounces fresh lime juice
  • ½ teaspoon Maggi seasoning
  • ½ stalk of celery
  • ¼ medium cucumber
  • Salt

Directions
On a grill or in a cast iron pan, roast onion, ancho chili and half the jalapeño for 4–5 minutes, until onions begin to char. Remove from heat and place in a blender. Add remaining ingredients and blend until smooth, and salt to taste. Let sit for 10 minutes. Strain finely before serving.

Recipes from: Dylan Garret, Senior Digital Editor of WineEnthusiast (https://www.winemag.com/gallery/a-tale-of-two-sangritas/#gallery-carousel-1)

Drinking a Little True Blood

During my recent “fact finding” trip to Mexico we had a couple of hours on Sunday to enjoy some of  Eric Rubin’s delicious Sangrita alongside a shot of Blanco.

Sangrita is commonly confused with Sangria which is basically fruit-infused wine.  In Mexico, Sangrita (meaning “little blood”) is the traditional chaser that is served alongside a shot of Tequila.   It’s a blend of orange juice, tomato juice and a dash of hot sauce.  The flavor can run from citrusy sweet, to tomatoey tart.  I like Eric’s because I’m a fan of the tart side; the acidity complements the tequila and cleanses your palette.  And I love the kick.

And while Sangrita is great with Tequila many also like it as a side to their favorite beer as well. So you might serve with a Pacifico or a Modelo.

A nice presentation is on a small wooden tray with seasoned & regular salt plus lime wedges, or with sliced cucumbers with lime, salt, and chile de arbol.

Here’s how you can make your own:

Eric’s Spicy Sangrita:

Ingredients:

7 oz. fresh, seeded tomato juice

2 oz. fresh grapefruit juice

2 oz. fresh orange juice

2 oz. fresh lime juice

1 oz. Valentina or Tapatio hot sauce

1 oz. Tres Agaves agave nectar (which is optional but it does a nice job of balancing the heat)

1 fresh jalapeño or serrano pepper, sliced lengthwise (serranos are best as the seeds tend to not release from the pod)

1 tsp. black pepper

½ tsp. salt

Combine all ingredients in a pitcher and stir until the salt dissolves.  Let the mixture sit until it reaches the desired heat level; usually 15-30 minutes.  Discard the pepper and refrigerate.

Enjoy!